Should I Share It? Take This Test…

Today I had an epiphany.

I suddenly realized what’s wrong with half of the stuff posted on social media–and I’ve simplified the problem into a short test we can use to stop it from happening.

The problem: most of us “like” and “share” quotes which we would HATE if we heard them coming from someone we didn’t like.

It’s a problem because good, true things should be good and true no matter who says them. 

For example:  “Treat others the way you want to be treated.”

I think that’s good advice, whether Ghandi said it or Hitler.  It’s true either way.  (Pssssst.  Neither Ghandi nor Hitler said that. It was Jesus.  But you get the idea.)

Another quote I like is, “A bad day does not equal a bad life.”

Or what about, “If it doesn’t challenge you, it won’t change you.”

I would “like” or “share” these quotes whether I heard them from my best friend or from the girl who egged my house and stole my boyfriend in highschool.

(Psssst.  No one egged my house and stole my boyfriend in highschool. But you get the idea.)

Truth should be true, no matter who says it.  And that’s why I recommend that we STOP and think before sharing a piece of advice,

“Would I still like this quote if an enemy said it?”

Try it!

Let’s test some popular sayings from the Facebook group “Depression and Anxiety quotes”:

“Sometimes you have to give up on people, not because you don’t care, but because they don’t.”

When a friend posts something like this, we’re like, “HECK YES! That’s so empowering!”

But, when someone we don’t like posts it, we have a different opinion.

Go ahead, picture that person on Facebook who drives you crazy.  Maybe “enemy” is a strong word.  But think of the person you don’t usually see eye-to-eye with.   (Yes, even if it’s me! I don’t mind being used as the “person you don’t like” for this test.)

Imagine that irritating person said “sometimes you have to give up on people, not because you don’t care, but because they don’t.”

Hmmm…. does it still sound empowering?

Or does it make you think, “Oh….this is the kind of thing self-absorbed people say when they’re making excuses for cutting others out” ?

It’s not quite as memorable as the Golden Rule, is it?

Here’s another example!

“Do not immitate what is popular, for acceptance.  Practice what is authentic for the sake of your soul.”

When your friend posts it, you’re like, “Yes! You are authentically awesome, so you need to practice more of that!”

Buuuuut….when someone you disagree with posts it, the power wears off.  It doesn’t seem quite as true, for someone who is authentically a pain in the butt…

How about this:

“Your woman becomes a reflection of how you treat her.  If you don’t like how she’s acting, look at how you treat her.”

Friend posts it: “Woo-hoo!”

Psycho woman posts it: “Nah, it’s not his fault you’re a psycho.”

See how great this little test is?

Things that are good and true will be good and true no matter who says them!

So, before I share something that I think everyone needs to hear, I challenge myself to ask whether it’s ALWAYS true…


 

If you think this test of mine is something EVERYONE can use, please feel free to share it.  🙂

5 thoughts on “Should I Share It? Take This Test…

  1. insanitybytes22

    “Things that are good and true will be good and true no matter who says them!”

    LOL! Uhhhhm no, not if YOU’RE going to be the one saying it. 🙂 I’m teasing you, but honestly you’re entering into complex territory here, the subjective realm were “truth” really is relative. Who you are matters. What your intention is, matters. Who you are speaking to matters. Communication is not a cut and dry thing.

    “It’s a problem because good, true things should be good and true no matter who says them.”

    Perhaps it “should” be, but the truth isn’t like that at all. A fun example is Luke 4:Six, such a beautiful devotional some people actually post it on their fridge, but context really matters, who is speaking really matters.

    Or perhaps another example is the golden rule. Like,if I were behaving that way, I’d want someone to come along and smack me in the head and say “knock it off, you’re being stupid.” But of course the vast majority of us don’t perceive “do unto others,” that way at all. I think the spiritually mature often get that,but most of us are not spiritually mature. So if one hates a FB quote,does that make the quote wrong or is the person receiving it wrong?? Or is the person posting it deliberately engaging in abusive and passive aggressive subtexting? Remember the bible does tell us we can “speak with the tongues of men and angels,” have a beautiful “truth” and yet we are just clanging symbols.

    One of my favorite brain teasers about the nature of subjective truth is, “whether you believe Jesus is your Savior or you believe He isn’t, you are going to be right.”

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    1. mrsmcmommy Post author

      I figured someone would point out that things become more complicated the more we practice asking questions. 🙂 I’m glad it’s you who started the conversation…

      But, even though we don’t always get it right, the Truth stays constant. I maintain that a good place to start is to STOP our tiny-mindedness for a little bit and dig deeper…by trying to see things from other people’s perspectives.

      Too many of us don’t even take the first step toward the spiritual maturity you alluded to…

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Corey

    I used you as that person I don’t like and never agree with, and it changed the nature of my posts and likes.

    (PSST!! I didn’t use you as that person, it was just a great way to mirror your post structure!)

    Like

    Reply

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