Adopt, Don’t Shop

At least a few people agree with San Francisco’s new law–requiring pet stores to only sell rescue dogs, as opposed to buying-and-reselling from breeders.

 

“Great!”

“I love it!”

“Wonderful idea and new law!”

If you’re really concerned for the animals in shelters across the country, then I can see why you’d be excited about this.  The plan is two-fold:

  1. Encourage the adoption of homeless animals.
  2. and “Eradicate inhumane puppy-breeding operations” (often called “puppy mills”)

Many animal rights activists will argue that any type of breeding is wrong/unethical, even when the breeder is “reputable”:

Reputable breeders have a passion for breeding dogs and many do genuinely love the animals they care for, but that does not address the very real problem of what breeding pets does to the existing pet overpopulation problem.

According to the ASPCA, 1.2 million dogs are euthanized in shelters every year because of lack of space, resources, and people who are willing to adopt these animals.

…[T]he idea of producing more dogs to meet the “demands”…while there are hundreds of thousands of purebred dogs waiting in overcrowded shelters is incredibly irresponsible.

 

So, the argument seems to be that we should save a life rather than creating a new one.  (And, I’m not saying I disagree with that–per se.)

I’m just wondering whether these activists also have a problem with human in-vitro fertilization? 

When we demand that puppies be treated “humanely,” what do we really mean?…when there are thousands of HUMAN embryos frozen in banks, since their parents have gotten the babies they wanted and don’t know what to do with the rest…

(You can read more about frozen human embryos here.)

Is this what we mean by treating animals “humanely”?

Because, to me, fertility clinics that store frozen humans indefinitely sounds a bit like “large-scale breeding operations.”   Should we start calling them Baby Mills?

I’m really curious what you think–especially if you’re someone who believes families should “adopt, not shop” for their pets.  Do you feel the same about their human children, if they’re unable to conceive without help?

Should they “Adopt–not shop” for their babies?

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5 thoughts on “Adopt, Don’t Shop

    1. mrsmcmommy Post author

      I’ve heard of Christian couples who opt to only fertilize one or two eggs, and have them all implanted rather than freezing any of them… But, the downside is the risk that NONE of them will take (and it’s still a huge cost and overlooks the many children awaiting adoption). So, I’m still very uncomfortable with the idea of “manufactured babies.”

      On the other hand, some will argue that getting pregnant “the old fashioned way” is still morally wrong when there are children awaiting adoption. And I’m expecting Bio-Baby #4. So, I think it’s tricky. I’m not usually one to take a complicated issue and say, “THIS IS THE CORRECT ANSWER.”

      I think the Holy Spirit will do his own convicting in certain situations, if we are willing to have these discussions.

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      Reply
  1. silenceofmind

    A married couple from across the street recently acquired a service dog for the man because he has PDSD.

    The girl-dog is also a rescue dog who was abused when she was a puppy.

    I also suffer from PDSD and when the girl-dog was sitting in her driveway and spotted me from across the street, she knew she had spotted someone who could really use some of her affection and promptly went crazy with happiness and joy.

    I got some really good lubbin’s until her PTSD daddy got jealous and trained to be a zombie-dog in the presence of anyone but him.

    She still makes eye at me from across the street whenever she sees me.

    But I leave her alone because doing so would train to become a zombie-dog whenever she saw me.

    Dogs and cats really are wonderful and emotionally intelligent creatures who crave the attention of their human brethren.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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